Skip to content

How I decided to use my pork belly

November 17, 2008

meat_porkbellyconfit_61

So, I am becoming a bit obsessed with this pork belly. I had a dream last night that I was furiously researching all the different preparations I could and should do with it, and came to the conclusion in my dream that ONE pork belly would never be enough — I must go back to The Piggery and get more pork bellies! This coming weekend is the last they’ll be at the farmer’s market for the season — so I woke up thinking to myself “well, I guess I should go back and get another slab or two!”

A few of you commented that you’d like to see me try Ruhlman’s confit method, and that was the way I was leaning, too. I want to try Pim’s five-spice braise, and I also found an article today by Ming Tsai about making homemade bacon (with Ruhlman, no less!) So now I have three different things I need to try with pork belly!

But this week, the belly will be confited. I discovered a few years ago that duck confit is one of the best foodstuffs on this earth (duck confit is also something I’m going to try making this winter). In addition to to Ruhlman’s idea of breading and frying up “croutons” of confited pork belly to top a Caesar salad, I’m also thinking some crisped up pieces of pork belly confit would be pretty great as a topping for toasted baguette slices, maybe with roasted apples and some greens tossed in an acidic vinaigrette. Maybe I’ll toss some cubes of the confit with some homemade pasta, butternut squash, and spinach – yum. Confiting meat was traditionally used as method of preservation, so the confited pork belly should keep in my fridge (in the fat it’s cooked in) for a few months!

Let’s get down to it, then. Step 1 is to give the pork belly a good rubdown with kosher salt and quatre épices.

meat_porkbellyconfit_1

Okay – I had no white pepper, so it was black peppercorns that I pounded in my little mortar and pestle.

meat_porkbellyconfit_2

I combined the ground pepper with cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg — roughly 2:1:1:1.

meat_porkbellyconfit_3

A few garlic cloves were smashed and roughly chopped…

meat_porkbellyconfit_4

meat_porkbellyconfit_5

Now it’s time to rub the belly down with kosher salt and the quatre épices.

meat_porkbellyconfit_7

meat_porkbellyconfit_8

meat_porkbellyconfit_9

I tucked the belly into a large ziploc bag and into the fridge it went overnight.

Coming up tomorrow, step 2: the spa treatment for my pork belly continues with a long, slow simmer in fat (the “confit” part!) ‘Till then…

4 Comments leave one →
  1. November 18, 2008 1:29 am

    Mmmmmm, looks good already. Can’t wait to see what’s next! I go to a school with a big agriculture program, and I bet I could get pork belly from the meat lab (they sell products from meat processing class, how cool is that?)…

  2. November 18, 2008 5:58 am

    woohoo! can’t wait to see the outcome and I am loving all of your ideas for future dishes.

  3. November 18, 2008 7:17 pm

    Pork belly is a wonderful thing, you should definitely try making your own bacon!

  4. lisa permalink
    November 18, 2008 10:21 pm

    LOVE the series of photos, step by step photos are soooo educational, even if I never make the recipe demonstrated. Thank you for your great blog.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: